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“We Should All Be Feminists” is the feminist book we needed all along

“We Should All Be Feminists” | Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | 49 pages| Vintage Books | Goodreads I love TedTalks, but I very rarely fully absorb the information the way I absorb written material. With that in mind, I picked up this little 8 dollar copy of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s “We Should All Be Feminists,” which is essentially the written adaptation of her viral Tedx presentation (yes, the one that Beyoncé excerpted). If, like me, you’re the sort who likes to reread poignant sentences and sticky note facts to look up later, perhaps this is the better format for you. As a text,…

Book Review | The Fire This Time, edited by Jesmyn Ward

The Fire This Time |  edited by Jesmyn Ward | ECW Press | Pub: 8/02/2016 | Goodreads  Toward the end of his The Fire Next Time, Baldwin emphatically states that the inability to resolve its “racial nightmare” is a sin for which America will eventually be held accountable. Race, and whether American can ever overcome its legacy, isn’t something about which Baldwin comes to an simple conclusion. Jesmyn Ward begins her anthology The Fire This Time by pulling this specific quote from Baldwin’s meditation: “…If we do not dare everything, the fulfillment of that prophecy, recreated from the Bible in song by the slave, is upon us: God gave Noah the rainbow sigh, No…

6 Times nayyirah waheed Embodied ‘Black Lives Matter’ in Poetry

If you haven’t already fallen in love with nayyirah waheed, now’s the time to do so. Her poetry, popularized through social media, is oftentimes short and powerful– some lines reading more like one brief self affirmations. Like Warsan Shire, she manages to talk about a long list of societal and internal struggles. Her 2013 latest book, salt., is an insightful exploration of identity that will resonate with those who have been following the troubling events of last week and beyond.

Understanding Oppression through Literature: Part 1

In undergrad, I was blessed to attend a college with courses such as Philosophy of Sex and Domination, Native American Philosophy, Refugee Issues,African Diaspora and the World, and The Sociological Imagination. These courses, and readings that accompanied them, were vital in shaping my understanding of oppression and the limitless forms it takes around the world. Here are some of the picks that have stuck with me in the years that have followed. Feel free to add some other ones in the comments. This won’t be the only list like this because I have recommendations for days. Keep an eye out, because I’ll be…

My book club read Citizen, and yours should too

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars Short Review: Rankine’s fusion of poetry, prose, and visual art is a fascinating look at everyday racism that will be very familiar to many Americans. Last night was our monthly book club meeting, and let me tell y’all– it was fantastic. Between bites from the moderately successful bibimbap bar, we discussed Citizen: An American Lyric, by Claudia Rankine.  Citizen gained steam after a young black woman was seen reading it during a Donald Trump rally.

Book Review | The Meaning of Freedom and Other Difficult Dialogues, by Angela Y. Davis

One of the most intersectional scholars of our time, Davis covers a diverse range of subjects, including (but certainly not limited to) mass incarceration, transgender rights, and civil engagement. The sum of these varied talks embodies her very specific brand of intellectualism; one which ties together seemingly unrelated sociopolitical dynamics.

Read like my book club!

While I make a valiant effort, I don’t review every single book that I read. Sometimes, I have far too many books queued up to take the time, or sometimes life holds my calendar hostage. Unfortunately, the books from my book club are most often the ones I skip reviewing. We read such good stuff, I hate that I overlook them on this blog. For those of you who aren’t a part of book clubs, I really cannot recommend them enough. They’re a great reason to read new books, or catch up on ones the whole group forgot to read….